Posts byLouie Dean Valencia

Yvonne Craig: A pioneer of women’s representation in the super-hero world

Today, Yyvone Craig, best known for originating the Barbara Gordon/Batgirl character in the 1960s, passed away due to complications from breast cancer. She was 78. I met Craig once at a comic book convention in Austin. She was kind and generous with her time. When I met her, she was sitting at a table chatting
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Why I’m Giving Up Comics for a Year, or the Biggest Decision of My Life (And Most People Won’t Get it)

Dear DC Comics Entertainment, I’ve been reading the adventures of Superman, the sensational Wonder Woman, and all the other world’s finest DC Comics since I was kid. I am one of those millennials that you so covet—although I’m not a new reader per se. I have to admit, I didn’t really like the way The
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Andrew W. Mellon Predoctoral Fellowship

Museum of the City of New York

‘m incredibly excited to announce that I was just named one of three Andrew W. Mellon Predoctoral Fellows at the Museum of the City of New York. As part of the fellowship, I will be working at the museum two days a week for fourteen months. The first two months will be dedicated to training. Afterward, the fellowship
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Clashing with Fascism: Spain’s Democratic Transition in Punk Comic Books

Johns Hopkins University, March 2015

46TH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE HISTORICAL STUDIES   “Marginalized Identities and Cultural Production in Modern Spain”, 22 March 2015 Chair: Sandie Holguín, University of Oklahoma Allyson C. González, Brandeis University: “The ‘True’ Catholic Woman was Sephardic? Rebecca Aguilar and the Ambiguities of Spanish Womanhood” Charles A. McDonald, New School for
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Q: Batman or Superman? A: Wonder Woman.

Just in case anyone had any doubts.

Some people wonder who would win… Really, it’s pretty simple… Wonder Woman is a warrior born… The daughter of Amazons… She has the strength of Demeter. Has the wisdom of Athena… The speed and flight of Hermes… The eyes of Artemis… Even the beauty of Aphrodite… Not to mention the ability to discern the truth from
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Representing Queerness in the DCU

Sean/Shvaughn Erin and Jan Arrah (Element Lad)

DCUQ  friend recently asked me for “gay male comic book” recommendations. I named off some of the well-known characters in the DC Universe today: Alan Scott (the Golden Age Green Lantern who was reimagined as gay in DC’s recent relaunch, The New 52), Miguel José Barragán (aka Bunker who first appeared in Teen Titans #1, vol. 4)….and… ugh… I
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#Referendumya Day 2: Making Working Groups and Police Intimidation

n Tuesday, 3 June,  a couple of thousand people showed up at the Puerta de Sol for the second day of #referendumya.  After the “asameblea de los mayores” (Senior citizen assembly), the general assembly started off.  There was noticeable tension between the two, as the general assembly seemed ready for more action, and less talking. After
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Painting Bohemian Lives: Absinthe, Ideology, and the Politics of Urban Life

Fordham’s first digital humanities history course! Based on nearly two years of research and preparation, this cultural history  course has students study bohemianism starting in the 19th century using social network theory, queer theory, urban space theory, and critical theory, while collecting oral histories, creating digital content, and maintaining a website made for a public audience. Course
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Making a Scene: Reviving the Public Sphere through Sex, Drugs, and Comic Books

    I will be presenting at the Council for European Studies in Washington D.C. on the 15th of May! Making a Scene: Reviving the Public Sphere through Sex, Drugs, and Comic Books Saturday, March 15, 2014 Committee (Omni Shoreham) Louie Dean Valencia-García , History, Fordham University In the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War, the newly
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The Gallows are Busy

n January, I had the honour of being apart of the new publication, The Gallows Are Busy, published by Cicada Press, a collaborative effort of different artists, writers, and thinkers exploring suspension and disassociation from various perspectives. My contributions include a short piece entitled “Madrid Kills Me: Queer Obsessions and Late Nights in the Movida Madrileña”.  The reflective
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Acción, meditaciones y muerte de Juan Bravo

My first publication with the digital archival project, Archivo de la Frontera, has been published online.  Serving on the Scientific and Editorial Committee, I will also be publishing documents related to my research on youth culture in Spain in the 1960s and 70s.  This first publication, an introduction to censorship documents relating to the Emilio
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I want to write a social history about the Movida and everyday people…

Just thought I would share this article that was written about my research in a local newspaper in Madrid, SomosMalasaña: “Quiero escribir una historia de La Movida social y de la gente corriente” Escribir el primer libro en inglés sobre La Movida Madrileña. Ese es el propósito de Louie Dean Valencia, un joven historiador norteamericano al que
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Feísmo ilustrado, or Illustrated Ugliness—beauty in Madrid

andering around the city centre in Madrid the semi-attentive observer will start to see a very curious theme appear—feísmo ilustrado—, or “illustrated ugliness”.  However, not only does this street art have a wonderful theme and impressive body of work (ALL OVER THE CITY CENTRE), but the artist(s) broadly succeed at getting the heart of Madrid
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Adventures in Tetuán… Tracing the Past

oday’s adventures brought me to the Estrecho Metro stop—a train station opened in 1929 in a working class neighbourhood called Tetuán.  A lead on the Internet brought me to Hiper Comics, owned by José. Tetuán is made of approximately 49% of retired people, 11.74% unemployed, and 35% of the overall population is immigrant (source: FRAVM). Tetuán is also known
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curation of ourselves: digital identities and publicness in the 21st century

 am a discerning poster on Tumblr, carefully choosing what I post.  On Facebook, I bounce between news articles and the like that I think are worth reading; however, my status updates primarily revolve around my coffee, comic book and bibliophile addictions—with heavy accents of internet meanderings which I find informative or noteworthy (many thanks to
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vinyl makes us hipsters feel better about ourselves, or, why I love vinyl

ipsters everywhere love vinyl.  The sound is “warmer”, they say. What is warm sound?  Far from a music theorist, I will try to describe what it is about vinyl that turns the hipster into an addict of vinyl.  I currently have thousands of songs in my iTunes; I also have an affinity for vinyl—even going to
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From Meydan Tahrir to Wisconsin: Rethinking Revolution, Democracy and Citizenship

Excited to present at Cornell University’s conference From Meydan Tahrir to Wisconsin: Rethinking Revolution, Democracy and Citizenship  this weekend!  I’ll be presenting my paper “Spanish Revolution: Youth, Dissent & “Occupying” Space in Madrid” on a panel titled  Space, Time, & Occupation, which will consider the tactics and strategies used by young people in the summer of
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Truth, Justice, and the American Way in Franco’s Spain

I’m “super” excited to announce the publication of the new book of which I am apart, The Ages of Superman: Essays on the Man of Steel in Changing Times,  edited by Joseph J. Darowski. Darowski writes: Louie Dean Valencia García provides a different view of this American icon, by analyzing Superman’s influence in Spain during the 1950s
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A Growing Indignant Global Youth Movement

Tahrir Square in Cairo, the Puerta de Sol in Madrid, Syntagma Square in Athens, Bloombergville in New York City, and the current “street riots” in London have been only some of the sites of dissent in which young people have attempted to counter perceived injustice embodied by dictators, self-interested politicians and insatiable corporate and financial
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A call for dialogue

Who are all of you? Geographers, linguists, psychologists, journalists, writers, actors, historians, fundraisers, public policy experts, teachers, archeologists, sound designers, poets, organizers, musicians, researchers, mathematicians, economists, green experts, cultural studies experts, biologists, med students, philosophers, law students and lawyers, architects, engineers, political scientists, sports and fitness experts, ex-Marines, health psychologists, artists, environmental interpreters, counselors, immigration
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The Dionysian Representation of Tadzio as a Reflection of Aschenbach’s Humanity in Death in Venice

  This essay was originally presented at the “Death, Sex, and Boredom” conference held at Fordham University, Spring 2010. The format of Thomas Mann’s novel, Death in Venice (1912), leads the reader to believe that it is a classically structured tragedy; however, I assert that this tale of a mature German man that seemingly stalks a fourteen
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