Posts byLouie Dean Valencia

Clashing with Fascism: Spain’s Democratic Transition in Punk Comic Books

Johns Hopkins University, March 2015

46TH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE HISTORICAL STUDIES   “Marginalized Identities and Cultural Production in Modern Spain”, 22 March 2015 Chair: Sandie Holguín, University of Oklahoma Allyson C. González, Brandeis University: “The ‘True’ Catholic Woman was Sephardic? Rebecca Aguilar and the Ambiguities of Spanish Womanhood” Charles A. McDonald, New School for
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Q: Batman or Superman? A: Wonder Woman.

Just in case anyone had any doubts.

Some people wonder who would win… Really, it’s pretty simple… Wonder Woman is a warrior born… The daughter of Amazons… She has the strength of Demeter. Has the wisdom of Athena… The speed and flight of Hermes… The eyes of Artemis… Even the beauty of Aphrodite… Not to mention the ability to discern the truth from
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Representing Queerness in the DCU

Sean/Shvaughn Erin and Jan Arrah (Element Lad)

DCUQ  friend recently asked me for “gay male comic book” recommendations. I named off some of the well-known characters in the DC Universe today: Alan Scott (the Golden Age Green Lantern who was reimagined as gay in DC’s recent relaunch, The New 52), Miguel José Barragán (aka Bunker who first appeared in Teen Titans #1, vol. 4)….and… ugh… I
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Painting Bohemian Lives: Absinthe, Ideology, and the Politics of Urban Life

Fordham’s first digital humanities history course! Based on nearly two years of research and preparation, this cultural history  course has students study bohemianism starting in the 19th century using social network theory, queer theory, urban space theory, and critical theory, while collecting oral histories, creating digital content, and maintaining a website made for a public audience. Course
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The Gallows are Busy

n January, I had the honour of being apart of the new publication, The Gallows Are Busy, published by Cicada Press, a collaborative effort of different artists, writers, and thinkers exploring suspension and disassociation from various perspectives. My contributions include a short piece entitled “Madrid Kills Me: Queer Obsessions and Late Nights in the Movida Madrileña”.  The reflective
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Rimbaud in New York

David Wojnarowicz and Arthur Rimbaud. Two boys suffering untold abuses. Connected through the messy  bloodstain of art, a paper mask worn by so many. Rimbaud was shot at by his lover, Verlaine. Wojnarowicz was shot by mistake by a stranger. Both were boys living on the street, abused by men. poetics bled from them both.
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Notebooks for Dialogue

Just wanted to share with you all the new imagining of the project that originally started on BurntCitrus.  It’s called Notebooks for Dialogue (sound familiar?)  The content will be provided primarily by students enrolled in my class “understanding historical change: early modern europe, or, murder! treason! equality! and terror!”  More coming soon!
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curation of ourselves: digital identities and publicness in the 21st century

 am a discerning poster on Tumblr, carefully choosing what I post.  On Facebook, I bounce between news articles and the like that I think are worth reading; however, my status updates primarily revolve around my coffee, comic book and bibliophile addictions—with heavy accents of internet meanderings which I find informative or noteworthy (many thanks to
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how much does free speech cost?

I often pass by the advertisements in the New York Subway (which are now underwater) and barely pay attention.  Usually, it is something banal that doesn’t interest someone who doesn’t own a television. However, recently, when walking through Grand Central Terminal to meet up with some friends for a day of coffee shop hopping and
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From Meydan Tahrir to Wisconsin: Rethinking Revolution, Democracy and Citizenship

Excited to present at Cornell University’s conference From Meydan Tahrir to Wisconsin: Rethinking Revolution, Democracy and Citizenship  this weekend!  I’ll be presenting my paper “Spanish Revolution: Youth, Dissent & “Occupying” Space in Madrid” on a panel titled  Space, Time, & Occupation, which will consider the tactics and strategies used by young people in the summer of
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A call for dialogue

Who are all of you? Geographers, linguists, psychologists, journalists, writers, actors, historians, fundraisers, public policy experts, teachers, archeologists, sound designers, poets, organizers, musicians, researchers, mathematicians, economists, green experts, cultural studies experts, biologists, med students, philosophers, law students and lawyers, architects, engineers, political scientists, sports and fitness experts, ex-Marines, health psychologists, artists, environmental interpreters, counselors, immigration
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Don’t waste our blood

This is as good of a topic as any to start a discussion, and it actually points to part of the purpose of this (hopefully) collaborative blog.  Last weekend I came across a group of queer students at NYU that were protesting a blood donation bus.  The protestors were loud, and were stopping people asking
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The Dionysian Representation of Tadzio as a Reflection of Aschenbach’s Humanity in Death in Venice

  This essay was originally presented at the “Death, Sex, and Boredom” conference held at Fordham University, Spring 2010. The format of Thomas Mann’s novel, Death in Venice (1912), leads the reader to believe that it is a classically structured tragedy; however, I assert that this tale of a mature German man that seemingly stalks a fourteen
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